Evil Dead

Evil-Dead

Evil Dead (2013) vs. The Evil Dead (1981)

Ah, remakes. There seem to be more and more of them being released these days, and fans have very strong opinions about them. In the last few years we’ve seen slick 21st century “re-boots” of I Spit On Your Grave, Halloween, Dawn of The Dead, Total Recall, The Wicker Man (Oh God, if only I could wash out my mind with soap and water!). The list is endless. There is even a re-make of Robocop due out in cinemas next month. If I am totally honest, I may not have courage to go and see the theatrical release. I value my cherished memories of the Paul Verhoeven original to much to risk sullying them with a sub-par “re-imagining”. You just know the damned thing will be awash with slick editing and state-of-the-art CGI and totally devoid of the cult vibe that made the original so entertaining. If and by that I mean if I do go and see it, I will write up a comparison here, once I’ve recovered from the inevitable disappointment.

I suppose the real question I should be asking myself is how did I become so jaded and cynical? The truth is, I don’t know. There is just something about modern movie-making that leaves me cold. It’s no one thing, but a combination of factors. They just seem too slick somehow. Too… Polished. And above all, too dark. I know the whole point of remakes is to shed the kitsch, cheesy vibe of the originals and appeal to a hip young audience (who simply were not born when the originals came out). I can relate to that but at the same time, that was what made the originals so special. Classic cult films (of any genre, but particularly horror) have a special atmosphere, a vibe, that cannot be recreated in today’s modern, high definition era. Many have tried, and done a reasonable job at it. Robert Rodriguez largely succeeded with Planet Terror a few years back, and the Soska Sisters films have kicked ass so far. It’s definitely possible, but rarely happens. Another factor is budget. Studios are under pressure to deliver a production quality that will appeal to this generation of movie goers, not just thirty-something horror and heavy metal nerds with a chip on their shoulder (i.e. me!). This, for me is the key issue. Only a fan would make that conclusion but here it is anyway. They are too well made. The quality is so good and the picture is so clear that there is nothing left of that grind house vibe that made them special in the first place. I feel the same sense of anti-climax with most mainstream rock and metal albums. They’re OK, but they are really too clean. I prefer underground stuff with that special quality that, while they may not be as well produced in the technical sense of the word, keep me coming back for more literally years after I bought original disc.

So… On to Evil Dead

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