Rock

Psychedelic-Witchcraft

Review: Psychedelic Witchcraft – The Vision

Psychedelic-Witchcraft-The-Vision

“People reject us. They will never know the answer to the question that we carry in our hearts.”

The Vision is the debut album from these Italian blues-doom rockers. The album is the follow-up to last year’s Black Magic Man EP, and offers nine tracks of smoky, classic blues rock with occult-themed lyrics. Singer Virginia Monti delivers said lyrics in a suitably witchy style, and manages to sound like she means it. That’s because she does!  (more…)

Black Sabbath cover

Black Sabbeth – Gonga Featuring Beth Gibbons

Bristol, UK doom rockers Gonga have teamed up with fellow Bristol-based singer Beth Gibbons (of Portishead fame) to record a cover version of the song that started off the debut album from the most important band in doom metal – Black Sabbath. They’re calling it ‘Black Sabbeth’ for obvious reasons. The video is made up of footage from the classic 1963 Mario Bava film Black Sabbath, after which the band were named.

Roadburn Festival

So… I’m Not Going To Roadburn This Year

2013 was a landmark year for me. I achieved three lifetime ambitions in twelve short months. My band recorded their debut album (which I’m proud to say will be released soon by an actual record label!), I completed a degree in English language and Literature and I attended my first ever Roadburn festival in Tilburg, Holland with four friends.

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Aranya Witch Mountain

Aranya – Friction/Refraction EP’s

I found this Portland, Oregon based band through Witch Mountain. Their vocalist Uta Plotkin is the founding member of this band, which plays live and records in between her Witch Mountain activities. Aranya’s music is a little different from WM’s more traditional sludge/rock/doom, and takes a more progressive approach.

Uta happens to play the viola (and I think piano as well), having had classical music training growing up. She makes good use of the viola in Aranya, playing some solos and melody lines to add variety to the otherwise guitar-based songs. I’ve noticed that many of her vocal melodies sound like viola or violin melodies, which is kind of interesting. I don’t know if it is intentional but it gives the music a unique feel that sounds completely different to the way most bands approach vocals.

Friction and Refraction are two separate, self-released EP’s that when put together, make up a short album’s worth of music. The first one, Friction, deals with “sexuality through heat metaphors” and it’s counterpart contains “five songs of reflection and rejuvenation,” to “soothe the beast.”

Aranya - FrictionFriction is made up of mainly aggressive, punkier material, similar to that found in the debut A Violent Birth album (released as a CDR in 2009). The four tracks pass by quickly in a blur of energy and passion that is difficult to make sense of.

This is, of course, intentional. The more time you spend listening to Aranya, the more you realise that everything they do is deliberate.

Being the sexual part of this binary experience (including the title), it doesn’t try to be too high-brow or deep. This is the animal, primal part of the two EP’s, as illustrated by the erupting volcano on the cover.

It’s exciting and intense, but it is over all too quickly, leaving the listener with a mild sense of disappointment and asking themselves “is that it?”

Friction is the passion, senseless intensity and ultimate meaninglessness of sex condensed into four songs.

RefractionRefraction is a much more introspective listening experience. Its five tracks are slower paced and more melodic than Friction with darker lyrics.

What I like about this EP is the sense of depth that the songs have. Lyrically, they are just as avant garde and weird as the rest of Aranya’s output, with esoteric references and metaphors that don’t always register on first listen. For me, this is one of the band’s greatest strengths. They don’t dumb themselves down in an attempt to pander to a wider audience. I can’t help thinking that this may prevent them from gaining a larger following, but I don’t imagine they care. The fans they do have are too busy enjoying the music.

After the sexual frenzy of Friction, this second EP can feel quite bleak and depressing in places. Again, intentionally so. Both recordings manage to manipulate the listener’s emotions and take them on a journey. They have no control over the destination, and are required to put their faith in Uta and her band. Hopefully they will be able to deal with the results!

Refraction features some unusual instruments such as trombone and accordion on the track Chicory Key. Hearing the old squeeze-box instantly put me in mind of ‘Allo ‘Allo. Though it’s possible that the band have never seen the show, it did make me smile!

Both EP’s are dedicated the the memory of Cyan Wunderlich, a friend and supporter of the band.

You can stream Friction and Refraction for FREE (alongside other releases) before you decide to buy, from the Aranya Bandcamp site:

aranya.bandcamp.com

www.aranyamusic.com

Copyright © Steve Wilson and The Third Realm, 2014

Jex-Thoth-Blood-Moon-Rise

Album: Jex Thoth – Blood Moon Rise

I have been a fan of Jex Thoth since their self-titled 2008 debut. The first offering was a mixture of low-fi fuzz guitar and psyche jamming, but represented a major leap forward in songwriting and performance from their debut EP, Totem, and second full-length is no different. I have read criticism that the first album suffered from poor musicianship, but I never thought that. This one does sound a lot glossier on first listen, though.The most striking change to the band has to be the complete line-up change they have undergone since those first two releases. Two of the original line-up were married (singer ‘Jex’ and bass/guitarist ‘Grim Jim,’ also of Wooden Wand) and are now separated, which I presume accounts for his departure. To be honest, it doesn’t really matter, as the music is as good, if not better than before.

jex band

Blood Moon Rise is a very dark record, and not the type of album that grabs you on first listen. The first time I played it, I was surprised by how smooth everything sounds compared to their earlier efforts. It’s the only word I can use to adequately describe the sound. After a short, moody opening piece, the album starts proper with single ‘The Places You Walk.’ Jex Thoth songs have been described as ‘doom ballads’ in several reviews, and that is definitely the case here. The lyrical subject matters switch between relationships/love back to esoteric occult themes such as the epic closing number ‘Psyar’ (I have no idea what this means without Googling!). So, am I saying that Jex’s lyrics are stereotypically feminine in their themes? Well, yes, I am in a way, but this isn’t necessarily a bad thing. Jex clearly knows what she is singing about, and her voice sounds beautiful and is one of the aspects of the band that benefits most from this album’s superior production. It’s been well mastered, too and sounds clear and warm. These two things are important for a Jex Thoth record for one simple reason: You need to listen to this band on vinyl. I have both the CD and LP versions of their first record and there is no comparison. The vinyl wins every time (if only for the Albert Witchfinder sleeve art).

While I loathe the term ‘female-fronted doom band’ for so many reasons, I will briefly use the term here. While I do hate the term, Jex Thoth stand alongside Witch Mountain as an example of that at its best. Also, listen out for Earth cellist Lori Goldston on the last track.
Edit:
Since writing this review, I have bought a vinyl copy of the album. Like Jex’s previous work, it sounds twice as good on my turntable as the digital version I reviewed here. If you can afford it, get the LP. It’s worth the extra cash.
Out now on I Hate Records
Copyright © Steve Wilson and The Third Realm, 2014