video

Video: IRON MAIDEN – Speed of Light

Here’s the video for new single ‘Speed of Light,’ from my all-time favourite band, IRON MAIDEN. The video sees the band’s mascot (Eddie the ‘Ed) playing through the evolution of video games from the early ’80’s right up to the modern 3D era, with the graphics getting better each time. Great stuff!

Their new album The Book of Souls is out next month. I can’t wait to check it out.

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Planet of The Apes

Time of The Apes (Japanese Planet of The Apes!)

I hope you all enjoy this random retro movie that I found on YouTube while looking for a trailer for something else. It’s a Japanese remake of Planet of The Apes from the 1970’s. This is an English dubbed version. I just had to share it!

Horror Films

Why Do We Watch Horror Films?

According to Wikipedia, “Horror is a film genre seeking to elicit a negative emotional reaction from viewers by playing on the audience’s primal fears.”

Why would anyone choose to spend their time viewing a genre that affects them in an emotionally negative way? What kind of masochism is being indulged in here? I’m usually too busy watching my favourite classic horror films to care why I enjoy them, but it’s something I’ve been thinking more about lately.

The fact is, some of us get a kick out of being scared. This is a universally accepted fact. The question is, why do we enjoy feeling threatened by imaginary monsters, vampires and ghosts? (more…)

cult film horror

Cult Film: Blood Orgy of The She Devils (1972)

“A terrifying, screaming plunge to the depths of Hell!”

BOOTSD

Blood Orgy of The She Devils

Produced by Ted V. Mikels (Astro Zombies, The Doll Squad), this film has a one-star rating on its IMDB page. Despite this less than encouraging first impression, I was determined to give the film a chance. After all, someone had kindly uploaded it on to Youtube so I would be watching for free. I had nothing to lose and I can’t resist an obscure old horror with witchcraft and scantily-clad actresses. In fact, the one-star rating piqued my interest. If the general viewer considers the film to be complete garbage, then it just might turn out to be a hidden gem!

Of course, the film does not entirely live up to it’s title, but it does feature some scenes that attempt to depict witchcraft.

Lila Zaborin stars as Mara “queen of the black witches.” She presides over a coven of impressionable teenage girls (who also happen to be reincarnated witches!) and performs demonstration rituals for them for a living with a view to teaching them the secrets of the Black Arts.

While these rituals are taking place, Dr. Helsford (an expert on witchcraft) meets with two students, Mark (Tom Pace) and Lorraine (Leslie McRay). He attempts to explain the historical truth behind witchcraft, and goes into some detail about the real life witch trials that took place in centuries past. There is a relatively chilling reenactment of a witch being burnt at the stake about mid-way through the film. This is one of the most interesting scenes along with the Mara coven scenes, which build in intensity as the film reaches its climax.

The plot is not that engaging, and the acting and dialogue is beyond cringe-worthy. That said, it is worth a watch for fans of obscure 60’s and 70’s horror. If you discovered these films through bands like Electric Wizard and Cathedral, then this will be a good choice. It’s not a patch on The Living Dead at The Manchester Morgue (this film makes it look like Shakespeare!), but is does have some cool retro scenes for connoisseurs of exploitation cheese. Visually, it’s the kind of film you would expect to see projected behind a band at the Roadburn Festival.

If you’ve seen Zombie Flesh Eaters so many times that the idea of re-watching it scares you more than the movie itself, then you could do worse than Blood Orgy of The She-Devils. Just don’t set your expectations too high.

Remember: You can find the whole thing on Youtube for free, but to be honest the two-minute trailer I’ve included here covers all the best bits!

Copyright © Steve Wilson and The Third Realm, 2014

Prison

Cult film: Prison (1988)

Prison is a supernatural horror film directed by Renny Harlin (Die Hard 2, Cliffhanger, The Long Kiss Goodnight). It’s one of a growing number of ’80′s horrors that passed me by before the DVD-era. I have never seen it on TV and I don’t remember its theatrical release (I can vividly recall Ghoulies, A Nightmare on Elm Street and Friday The 13th advertising campaigns, despite being far too young to see them at the time – I was born in 1979).

The film stars Viggo “Aragorn” Mortenson, back in the days when he used to appear in low-budget horrors (for another watchable example, see 1990′s Leatherface: The Texas Chainsaw Massacre III). He plays Burke, a young petty car thief who finds himself incarcerated in a newly reopened prison. The prison had previously closed some years ago because of the aftermath from an ill-omened execution. A prisoner (Charlie Forsythe) was wrongly accused of murder and sent to the electric chair. His ghost still haunts the prison, which, due to budget cuts, has been reopened

After a quiet first night, things start to go wrong. Burke and a fellow inmate are charge with reopening the execution chamber which (predictably enough), houses Forsythe’s ghost. An inmate attempts to escape, and is literally constricted by pipework and electrical cables when the prison’s inner workings come to life. A stream of gory and macabre incidents follow, with the corrupt warden (played by the late Lane Smith) carrying out increasingly harsh punishments on the inmates, while struggling to keep a hold on his own sanity.

Prison is a cross between The Shawshank Redemption and The Twilight Zone. It has plenty of supernatural scares, gory deaths and some really cool special effects that stand up well even today. Chances are you haven’t seen it, so I won’t spoil the ending. It’s well worth watching if you can find it on DVD. Like most of the cult horror films I will be reviewing here, however, don’t pay too much for it.

Copyright © Steve Wilson and The Third Realm, 2014